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| Last Updated:: 16/02/2017

Case Study

Upscaling Basic Sanitation for the Urban Poor (UBSUP) in Kenya

 

Upscaling Basic Sanitation for the Urban Poor (UBSUP) in KenyaThe programme covers the entire sanitation service chain. To date more than 6,500 toilets have been constructedin 23 towns and these are now serviced by 22 Water and Sanitation Service Providers (WSPs/utilities). UBSUP is implemented by the Water Services Trust Fund (WSTF) Kenya and jointly financed by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) and the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) through the German Development Bank (KfW). Technical assistance to the WSTF and other sector institutions is provided by GIZ.  Read More.....

 

SANITATION IN THE CIRCULAR ECONOMY

 

The TBC is a business-led coalition. We share a common vision and are committed to providing the leadership, mentorship and investment needed to accelerate the pace of change to achieve universal access to sanitation. Read More.....

 

Climate change and economic approaches into water allocation: optimization via direct benefits of water—the case study of Rudbar Lorestan hydropower dam (Iran)

 

Climate change will affect hydrologic patterns in the Middle East over future decades. Already limited water resources will become further limited, creating further challenges for water allocation protocols. While there is no integrated climate/water allocation framework to develop sophisticated dynamic allocation patterns, determining the economic value of water in various markets is one way to optimize water allocation. In this paper, a non-linear optimizer code through the Conjugate Gradient Method has been applied to optimize water allocation in the Rudbar Lorestan Hydropower system (Iran) across four sectors (agriculture, industry, power, and urban).  Read More....

 

Motivating improvements : Learnings from Health care facilities study- India and Bangladesh

 

Triangulation of observation from various studies including Qualitative(Photo elicitation) studies with various stake holders during Multi-centric WASH study in India and Bangladesh and observation from assessment of wash in HPT Health care facilities in Gujrat.  Read More....

 

Availability and satisfactoriness of latrines and hand washing stations in health facilities, and role in health seeking behavior of women: evidence from rural Pune district, India

 

Water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) installations are indispensable in health care facilities. Their quality might also influence the decision whether to visit a health facility. We investigated the WASH infrastructure in small health facilities in rural Pune, India, and surveyed expectations and satisfactoriness among women. The availability and quality of WASH installations was assessed in 12 facilities using a checklist. Dedicated questions in a household survey provided the community perspective, complemented by qualitative methods. A few public facilities had no latrine or hand washing station. On the contrary, all private facilities offered such installations. The bed/outpatientto-installation ratio was also lower in private compared to public facilities. While most latrines were functional and well maintained, they often lacked garbage bins. Soap was often missing from hand washing stations. Dedicated latrines for women were rare. Women were generally satisfied with the WASH installations in the local health facility, but considered private facilities as better. Read More....

 

PROCEDURE FOR MANAGEMENT OF HAZARDOUS AND OTHER WASTES

 

Whereas the draft rules, namely the Hazardous And Other Wastes (Management and Transboundary Movement) Rules, 2015, were published by the Government of India in the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change vide number G.S.R. 582(E), dated the 24thJuly, 2015 in the Gazette of India, Extraordinary Part II, section 3, sub-section (ii) nviting objections and suggestions from all persons likely to be affected thereby, before the expiry of the period of sixty days from the date on which copies of the Gazette containing the said notification were made available to the public. Read More.....

 

Solid Waste Management Practices in Two Northern Manitoba First Nations Communities: Community Perspectives on the Issues and Solutions

 

For many First Nations in Northern Manitoba, solid waste management remains a serious, albeit under-researched, problem. A case study of solid waste management was undertaken in Garden Hill and Wasagamack First Nations, two remote fly-in communities in northern Manitoba. Solid waste management practices were investigated through interviews, participatory documentary video and laboratory analysis. Findings indicated that poor funding, absence of any recycling programs and lack of waste collection services contributed to indiscriminate burning and disposal in public places. Laboratory analyses revealed that soil samples from the dumpsites had arsenic, chromium, lead, zinc and copper above CCME guidelines. Read More....

 

Hazardous Waste Management

 

Hazardous waste arises from industrial and commercial activities and at the consumer levels. Management of this waste stream is a speciļ¬c challenge for Low- and Middleincome countries because of the high impact on human health and the environment if not treated properly. Moreover, it requires cost-intensive measures and infrastructure.

Read More....

 

Hazardous waste management in educational and research centers: A case study

 

The hazardous waste management (HWM) practice at Tehran University of Medical Sciences Central Campus, Iran, was investigated in this study. Four schools were selected and the required information such as type and amount of wastes, temporary storage methods, waste discharge frequency, and final waste disposal methods using sampling, questionnaires, interviews with laboratory staff, and reference to available documents were gathered. The quantity of hazardous waste generation per year excluding the uncontrolled wastewater was found to be 2.072 tons per year.

Read More.....

 

Review of Municipal Solid Waste Management: A Case Study of Nairobi, Kenya

 

Solid waste management (SWM) is a major public health and environmental concern in urban areas of many developing countries. Nairobi’s solid waste situation, which could be taken to generally represent Kenya’s status, is largely characterized by low coverage of solid waste collection, pollution from uncontrolled dumping of waste, inefficient public services, unregulated and uncoordinated private sector and lack of key solid waste management infrastructure. Solid waste generated on daily basis is 4,016 tonnes as predicted by Allison (2010). The collection rate is as low as 33% (JICA, 2010) which leaves about 2,690 tonnes uncollected (almost equal to the total daily waste generation as predicted by JICA (1998)). Apart from Nairobi City Council (NCC), the body that has the primary responsibility for the provision and regulation of SWM services in the city, other actors have come into play such as private companies and community based organizations among others. The models of operation of these actors are not well understood. Effective coordination among these actors is also absent and regulation of the private companies by the city council is only beginning to emerge. According to Mwangi, 2007, analysis of total costs incurred by various actors and amount of waste collected per month showed that CBOs had the least fixed cost of operation as compared to private companies. Read More...

 

CASE STUDY ON MUNICIPAL SOILD WASTE MANAGEMENT THROUGH PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

 

Anthropogenic activities in various sectors of the society result in generation of large quantities of waste (liquid & solid) causing excessive pollution and threat to human health. The problem is ever intensifying as a result of change in life style, growth in population and indiscriminate expansion of towns and cities without due regard to environmental consideration.  Read More...

 

A Case Study on Municipal Solid Waste Management in Chandan Nagar City

 

Solid waste management is one among the fundamental and essential services provided by municipal authorities in the country to keep urban centers clean. Solid waste management has always been a serious problem for cities throughout the world. It is not different in developing countries like India. In certain regions of our country, the free disposal facilities have reached their own capacity and even local governments are confronted with difficult decisions. Modern civilization has brought a lot of luxuries and conveniences to our lives. However, with all of the amenities that modern life brings us, they also cause us to contribute to producing a large quantity of trash that needs to be taken care of. Fortunately, there’s the field of solid waste management, and it is with that Solid Waste Management that modern lives are enjoyable without the disturbance or refuse. Solid waste management is an integral element of modern society. Even if we don’t get to see what goes on at the facilities and plants that procss and dispose of garbage, it still contributes to the well-being of our lives.  Read More....

 

CASE STUDY ON SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT UNDER AGARTALA CITY

 

Agratala is the capital of the indian state of Tripura and is second largest city in North-east india after guwahati, both municipal area and population. Agratala alies on the bank of hoara river and is located 2 km from bangladesh. Agratala has temple and palaces. As per 2011 censua popolation of Agratala city is 399,688 with one lakh migrating population daily. Percentage of literacy according to 2011 census is 93.88, higher than the national literacy rate. Read More...

 

Studies on Municipal Solid Waste Management in Mysore City- A case study

 

Solid waste management is a worldwide phenomenon. It is a big challenge all over the world for human beings. The problem of municipal solid waste management (MSWM) is also prevailing in the urban environment of Mysore. Therefore the present study was taken to find out the problems and prospects of Municipal solid waste in Mysore city. A detailed investigation was made regarding the methods of practices associated with sources, quantity generated, collection, transportation, storage, treatment and disposal of Municipal solid waste in Mysore city.Read More...

 

A CASE STUDY OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT IN THE MUNICIPALITY OF JINGSHAN, CHINA

 

This thesis focuses on the solutions of problems related to municipal solid waste management in Jingshan which is a small city in the southern part of China. First of all, I would like to express my high appreciation to my supervisor Per Lundgren for his great helps on this thesis. He has plit a great efforts to my literature searching and studying, and given me very important guidance on how to compare and choose the different was te treatment technologies. With his rich experiences of working on many big was te management projects, he could supervise me correctly and practically. And as a professionaI consultant on environmental issues, he has greatly helped me on studying the feasible solutions of municipal solid was te problems in Jingshan. Read More...

 

Solid Waste Collection and Segregation: A Case Study of MNIT Campus, Jaipur

 

Abstract—Solid waste management is a worldwide phenomenon. Improper management of solid waste (SW) causes hazards to inhabitants. It is a big challenge all over the world for human beings. The problem of solid waste management (SWM) is also prevailing in the urban environment of MNIT Campus. Therefore the present study was taken to find out the problems and prospects of solid waste MNIT, Jaipur. A detailed investigation was made regarding the methods of practices associated with sources, quantity generated, collection, transportation, storage, treatment and disposal of solid waste in MNIT Campus. The data concerning to SWM in MNIT Campus was obtained through questionnaire, individual field visit, and interacting with people. Photographic evidences were also made about generation, storage, collection, transportation, treatment and disposal of Solid Waste. This study reveals that the present system of SWM in MNIT is not satisfactory Solid Waste Management. Read more...

 

Case Study of Mumbai: Decentralised Solid Waste Management

 

Mumbai Metropolitan Region (MMR), spread over 4,355sq. km is home to seven municipal corporations. All Municipal Corporations in India are mandated to look into solid waste management in their functional domains under the 74th Constitutional Amendment. At present, all the seven municipal corporations depend upon centralised means of managing waste which is dumped at assigned landfills post collection. Apart from the corporation, there are multiple players who play a crucial role in managing the waste. Much of this is managed by informal sector and now emerging recyclers who are setting up processes for decentralised waste management. Read More....

 

DD Palem - an ODF Gram Panchayat

 

It does not really matter how many houses have toilet facility in a village. The very fact that there is no 100 per cent coverage makes open defecation a reality and hence a problem for the entire village. That is the case with Deepaladinne Palem.

Read More...

 

A Sarpanch who won’t Stop at Just Ending open Defecation

 

Sincere efforts of people never go waste, especially if the effort is from a person from within the community and has not just chronological years but also wisdom gained from experience. In the village of K. Rajupalem, located in the Ballikurava Mandal of Prakasam district, Mr Gadde Muralidhar Rao, the Sarpanch of the GP, is one such person. He played a pivotal role in mobilizing the community for the construction of toilets under the Swachh Bharat Mission. Read More...

 

An ODF declared village under SBM

 

Winning an Open Defecation Free (ODF) badge may be easy. But how to sustain it? Ask the Panchayat team and the community at Bollavaram in Muppala Mandal of Guntur district. Post-achievement, the Gram Panchayat (GP) team is now concentrating on motivating the community to end open defecation completely. The team has devised a mechanism where everyone watches over the others. If any community member finds someone defecating in the open, he or she will have to report it to the Sarpanch who will then either counsel them or levy some small amount as fine whichever is felt necessary. Read More...

 

Gollapadu Gram Panchayat joins the ODF list under SBM

 

When the community perceives a need, it is easy to fulfil that need. And when the leader of the community is someone who experiences the need more than others, the solution for the need is bound to be close. Gollapadu Gram Panchayat (GP); located in Muppala Mandal of Guntur district is one such village where both things happened. Read More...

 

Rudravaram: an ODF village declared under SBM

 

The success of an initiative depends not just in executing it the first time. It is dependent on the follow-up and monitoring and on consistent utilisation. And such success is even further enhanced when a community goes beyond the initial idea and explores other benefits and systems. Rudravaram is a Gram Panchayat (GP) that is achieving exactly this. The Gram Panchayat is now heading beyond Open Defecation Free status (ODF) to address other issues such as solid and liquid waste management, ensuring cement roads, and underground drainage and sanitation facilities for all households in the GP. Read More...

 

A Journey of CHODAVARAM towards achieving Open Defecation free Status

 

Even when we have fool proof plans for a project, sometimes strange challenges arise, as it happened with Chodavaram Gram Panchayat (GP) in Penamaluru mandal of Krishna District. The village with a total population of 3384 in 980 households has been declared as Open Defecation Free village in 2015. Though most of the households had constructed toilets with their own money, complete coverage of sanitation with respect to toilets was achieved by constructing 37 Individual Household Latrines (IHHLs) for the left over households under SBM. Read More...

 

Sarpanch Leads - ODF status follows

 

When a mission has a large framework and involves big goals, it is essential to work in coordination, as efficient teams. And deploying the community in the endeavours supported by the Government is a great way to inculcate a sense of ownership among people. Read More....

 

Demand for household sanitation: The case of India

 

Worldwide, India has the highest number of people defecating in the open. In an attempt to reduce number of open defecation, a supply side initiative is underway. In 2014-2015, Government of India, constructed 8 million toilets. However, an important aspect for this supply-side initiative to become successful is to create demand for toilets. In this paper we look at household demand for toilets, and study the factors leading to open defecation. Using Demographic and Health Survey data we create a wealth index, and use it to rank household preference for toilets vis-à-vis 20 other different consumer durables. Read More...

 

Sewage Treatment and Management in Goa, India

 

Water pollution in India is primarily associated with unmanaged urbanization, population explosion, inadequate capacity of sewage treatment, and its disposal, which lead to unhygienic and insanitary conditions. This paper gives an overview on sewage treatment plants (STPs) in Goa—a coastal state in India. Being a famous tourist destination, it is important to monitor and control water pollution levels in Goa state, so as to safeguard the health of tourists and thereby the economy of the region. The capacity-wise distribution of STPs was mapped against regional population distribution and drainage system of Goa using ArcGIS. This information will be very useful for further analysis of the allocation of STPs and its adequacy with regard to the population. A majority of STPs at Goa are managed by private authorities like hotels and resorts. Four municipal plants under Goa Public Works Department were evaluated. Read More.....

 

Who is managing the post-ODF process in the community? A case study of Nambale sub-county in western Kenya.

 

Post-ODF follow-up is central to sustaining open defecation free (ODF) status, and needs to be integrated into CLTS programming from the outset. This chapter explores who is to carry out these activities, and how they might be motivated and financed. It argues for the importance of identifying existing administrative and social structures prior to implementation. Looking at reasons for success in Nambale sub-county, which was declared ODF in 2012, the chapter discusses the role of Community Health Workers (CHWs), who, under the Kenyan Community Health Strategy Approach (CHSA) have an expanded remit that includes CLTS, in follow-up and in reaching the poorest and most marginalized within communities. The chapter highlights challenges which have arisen, such as incentives to motivate CHWs, as well as the risk that devolved government structures lead to inequity among districts and varying levels of funding for the same activities, thereby threatening ODF achievement and sustainability. Read More.....

 

SWIFT Story of Sustainable Change: Improving access to safe, sustainable sanitation in Nadapal, Turkana.

 

In Nadapal, a village in northern Kenya, residents had no access to sanitation, and instead practised open defecation in the bushes. Illnesses including diarrhoea, malaria and cholera were common.

 

Now, however, many of the households in Nadapal have built their own latrines within easy reach and have access to safe, sustainable sanitation for the first time, after Practical Action began implementing the Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) approach.Read More....

 

 

Consistency of Use and Effectiveness of Household Water Treatment Practices Among Urban and Rural Populations Claiming to Treat Their Drinking Water at Home: A Case Study in Zambia

 

Household water treatment (HWT) can improve drinking water quality and prevent disease, if used correctly and consistently. While international monitoring suggests that 1.8 billion people practice HWT, these estimates are based on household surveys that may overstate the level of consistent use and do not address microbiological effectiveness. We sought to examine how HWT is practiced among households identified as HWT users according to international monitoring standards. Read More...

 

Community-Led Total Sanitation in Indonesia: Findings from an Implementation Case Study

 

This learning brief shares key findings from a case study of community-led total sanitation (CLTS) implementation in Plan International Indonesia program areas, focusing on the roles and responsibilities of local actors. Several implications are relevant for consideration by Plan International Indonesia and other sanitation practitioners. Read more....

 

Community-led Total Sanitation in Lao PDR: Findings from an Implementation

 

This learning brief shares key findings from a case study of community-led total sanitation (CLTS) implementation in Plan International Laos program areas, focusing on the roles and responsibilities of local actors. Several implications are relevant for Plan International Laos and other sanitation practitioners working on CLTS programs. Read more....

 

Water quality of River Yamuna and Agra Canal in Delhi stretch

 

Hon’ble Supreme Court in its order dated 27.8.1999 directed Central Pollution Control Board to monitor the water Quality of River Yamuna at Palla, Nizamuddin Bridge, Agra Canal and Okhla at regular intervals. In compliance to the directions, Central Pollution Control Board has been regularly monitoring water quality of River Yamuna in Delhi stretch and submitting its report to this Hon’ble Court. Water quality of River Yamuna, with respect to desired water quality of Primary Water Quality Criteria Read more....

 

Gender Equality Results Nepal

 

DEVELOPMENT AIMS AND IMPACTS. The Community-Based Water Supply and Sanitation Sector Project aimed at expanding the coverage of improved water supply and sanitation facilities to poor and remote areas, and improving health and hygiene practices related to waterborne and sanitationrelated diseases. Key project results were (i) water supply services provided to 90,397 households, covering 716,542 people; (ii) water supply coverage increased from 72% (2002) to 89% (2010) with marked decrease in the time spent by women and girls in transporting water; (iii) latrines constructed in 44,768 households, of which 8,909 were in ultrapoor households and 354 were school latrines—contributed to the safety of women and girls; (iv) sanitation coverage among the rural population increased from 20% (2002) to 33.5% (2010); and (v) a total of 690 water users’ committees were formed with 52% of women members. Read more....

 

Gender Equality Results

 

DEVELOPMENT AIMS AND IMPACTS. The Urban Water Supply and Environmental Improvement Project sought to provide basic services of water supply, sanitation, and garbage collection and disposal in four cities in Madhya Pradesh, India. Impacts include increased access to sustainable water supply and enhanced sanitation infrastructure in these four cities. Over 5.6 million people benefited from improved water supply, while half a million people benefited from an improved wastewater management system and 4.7 million people benefited from an improved solid waste management system. Read more....

 

Tales of Shit: Community-Led Total Sanitation in Africa (PLA 61)

 

Where do you shit? In developing countries, the answer may determine whether you live or die. Around 2.6 billion people defecate in the open. The consequences are dire: shit carries disease and is a major killer. Recently, a radical new participatory approach called Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) has encouraged millions of people to look at, talk about and tackle the problems caused by open defecation. Communities analyse their hygiene habits and practices and mobilise to take collective action to totally sanitise their environments. Following its development and spread in Asia, CLTS is now being piloted in Africa, and this special issue of PLA Notes draws on this growing body of experience Read more....

 

Water quality surrounding to MSW dumps of Raipur city-A case study

 

In India, urbanization and rapid population growth have led to degradation of environment, by increased rate of exploitation of natural resources and generation of municipal solid wastes (MSW). Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) disposal is a big problem for most of the towns in developing countries. In India dumping of MSW on low laying area is the common practice in most of the towns. The dumping of waste in uncontrolled manner creates many kinds of problems for the surrounding environment. Ground water pollution is one of the serious effects of the MSW dumping. The assessment of impacts on ground water sources near to MSW dumps is of considerable importance in management and disposal of solid waste. The leachate may greatly affect the ground water sources near to the dumpsites. In the present study an attempt has been made to investigate the extent of impact on ground water sources namely open wells, shallow tube wells (depth less than 30 m) and deep tube wells (depth more than 50 m). Read more....

 

Case Stories on Menstrual Hygiene

 

A grade 9 student of Panchagram High School, Ghaighata Block, North 24 Parganas, West Bengal, the first rank holder in class with a lot of dreams to excel in life- this is Kheyali who is just 13 years old. Dipayanti is 14 and she is in Grade 10. Read more....

 

Recycling in Bogotá: A SWOT Analysis of Three Associations to Evaluate the Integrating the Informal Sector into Solid Waste Management

 

In emerging economies, recycling is an opportunity for the cities to increase the lifespan of sanitary landfills, reduce the costs of the solid waste management, decrease the environmental problems of the waste treatment through reincorporate waste in the productive cycle and protect and develop people’s livelihoods of informal waste pickers. However, few studies have analysed the possibilities and strategies to integrate formal and informal sectors in the solid waste management for the benefit of both. Read more....

 

Impact of Open Defecation Free (ODF) Campaign - a case study of Ranipani VDC, Parbat/Nepal

 

About 62 per cent people in Nepal have access to toilet. So we are moving ahead to improve this situation to meet the national target of sanitation for all by 2017. Towards the achieving this goal; Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) is an innovative way to achieve communities free from open defecation. It changes people’s behaviour by shifting mindsets – to focus their desire for, and triggering them to build a sanitation system themselves. It is a community-driven approach to improve sanitation behavior among the community peoples in developing countries; CLTS represents a strategic shift in focus from creating awareness to community people for the toilet construction for individual households to one that seeks to create ODF communities/ villages through behavioral changes in the entire community. Read more....

 

Combined solid waste management and basic sanitation Lokossa, Mono region, Benin

 

his case study describes a combined waste management and sustainable sanitation project conducted by GIZ in Lokossa, Mono region, Benin. The project has been developed by the GIZ advisory project “Concepts for Sustainable Waste Management” in cooperation with the GIZ Water and Sanitation Programme (PEP) of Benin. Local partners include the municipality of Lokossa, the NGOs Protos, DCAM Bethesda and the municipal association GI-Mono. Read more....

 

Anupam Angul Parichhan Angul A Campaign Led by the Community to Eeadicate Open Defecation

 

Swacch Bharat Mission (SBM) advocates construction of Individual Household Latrines by individuals and incentivises each individual beneficiary by a grant of Rs. 12,000/- after the construction. The approach we have adopted at Angul is a mix of this incentive approach and subsidy –less Community Led Total Sanitation approach. We trigger, motivate, mobilise the communties to accept and own up the mission of total sanitaiton in saturation mode and we also incentivise them with SBM subsidy. Read more....

 

Freedom from Open Defecation

 

Statements by two heavyweight politicians (Jairam Ramesh and Narendra Modi) suggesting that toilets are more important to India than temples have attracted a lot of attention. They provided an opportunity for a wellinformed debate on issues related to sanitation in the country, including why India is lagging behind even its poorer neighbour Bangladesh. For instance, Drèze and Sen (2013: 63) point out that the proportion of households with access to toilets in Bangladesh is 92% compared to 45% in India. Spears, Ghosh and Cumming (2013) fi nd that more than 70% of households in India defecate in the open. The failure to effectively contain and manage human excreta is associated with a wide range of health problems and a large disease burden (Prüss-Üstün et al 2008). Read more....

 

Creating demand for Toilets in Rural India.

 

Any situation to a problem of this magnitude has to address scale.Therefore, we created a solution within the Government framework. Government had reserved 15% of the NBA budget for IEC activities for improved sanitation.Read more....

 

No Toilet, No Wedding

 

"It was such an embarrassment… If only we had constructed a toilet earlier, we would not have had to face that incident," states 45 year old Bhoj Bahadur Magar, with a look of remorse on his face.
Magar living with his family of four in Barmajhiya, Katari VDC, Ward No. 8 in Udayapur District, was thinking of marrying off his daughter, Menuka. Menuka had completed her grade 12 and started teaching in the village school. Read more....

 

Freedom from Open Defecation Role of the Community

 

Open defecation is a major health hazard and causes enormous hardship, especially to rural women. Government funds for constructing toilets have to be supplemented with awareness campaigns to motivate ordinary people to do their part. Sarola, a village in Maharashtra, was able to become “open defecation free” with effective community participation, taking advantage of the Sant Gadgebaba Gram Swachhata Abhiyan. Toilets were built in every house, along with systematic management of solid waste. The village testifi es to the larger social benefi ts that can come from the efforts of a group of determined youth. Read more....

 

Women Self Help Group Members Join Hands to Adopt Total Sanitation in Koraput District

 

Household toilet access in Odisha is amongst the lowest in the country. According to the Census 2011, only 14.1 per cent of the rural households have access to sanitation facilities. With 84.7 per cent households practicing open defecation, the Total Sanitation Campaign (TSC) implemented in 2004 in 30 districts, was confronted with a challenging task to eliminate the practice of open defecation. More than constructing toilets, the challenge was in switching to a demand-led approach that focused on changing behaviour. Read more....

 

Collector’s item

 

A young farmer used manure of a community toilet, lowered his cost of cultivation
Shyam Mohan Tyagi can’t stop feeling jubilant. As he surveys his paddy field, there is a distinct glint in his eyes. It is puzzling because his crop looks exactly the same as those in adjacent fields. Tyagi is quick to explain the difference: the paddy in his field has been nurtured on a diet of urine and decomposed human faeces. He has stopped using fertilizers since 2006. Read more....

 

Is being too clean making us sick?

 

Over the past few decades, doctors have arrived at a counterintuitive hypothesis about our modern, ultra-sanitized world. Too much cleanliness may be causing us to develop allergies, asthma, inflammatory bowel diseases, and other autoimmune disorders.
The idea is that for many children in the wealthy world, a lack of exposure to bacteria, viruses, and allergens prevents the normal development of the immune system, ultimately increasing the chance of disorders within this system down the road. This is called the hygiene hypothesis. Read more....

 

Financing of the water, sanitation and hygiene sector in Uganda

 

The Millennium Development Goal (MDG) targets are to halve, by 2015, the proportion of people without sustainable access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation. In Uganda, therefore, 72% and 70% of the population should have access to clean water and improved sanitation by 2015 respectively. These targets are uniform across urban and rural areas. Uganda’s national target is to increase access to safe water in rural areas to 77% and in urban areas to 100% in 2015, and to increase access to improved sanitation in rural areas to 80% and in urban areas to 100%.Read more....

 

Water and sanitation: addressing inequalities

 

“Water is life”, said UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, at the opening session of the high-level meeting on sanitation and water for all, in Washington, DC, on April 11, 2014. Yet lack of access to safe drinking water, and poor sanitation and hygiene in many parts of the world, often leads to death. The Lancet Series on childhood pneumonia and diarrhoea estimated that in 2011 around 700 000 child deaths occurred from diarrhoeal disease alone. The Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 7c target to halve the proportion of people without sustainable access to safe water by 2015 has been declared on track, yet 768 million people globally are still without access to safe drinking water. In a letter in today’s Lancet, Mira Johri and colleagues argue that the indicator does not consider water quality, and should be reconsidered. Progress for sanitation is alarmingly off track. Read more....

 

UNSAFE DISPOSAL OF CHILD FAECES HARMFUL: STUDY

 

Despite Total Sanitation Campaign leading to increase in the number of households with toilet in the State, adoption of proper sanitation practices by the population still remains a far cry.
While the use of toilets, even by adults, in rural areas is sub-optimal and largely limited to female members of the household, an international study has drawn attention towards unsafe disposal of child faeces in rural areas. Read more....

 

ImplementIng effectIve knowledge management In emergencIes: a case study from somalIa wasH cluster

 

The Humanitarian Reform in 2005 established the Cluster approach as “part of a wider reform process aimed at improving the effectiveness of humanitarian response by ensuring greater predictability and accountability, while at the same time strengthening partnerships”2. At country level, Clusters have been tasked with ensuring “a more coherent and effective response by mobilizing groups of agencies, organisations and NGOs to respond in a strategic manner across all key sectors or areas of activity”3. To achieve the best outcomes possible, it is critical for each Cluster to manage knowledge effectively to assist Cluster members. WASH (water, sanitation and hygiene) is one of eleven Clusters. Other Clusters include Nutrition, Health, Food Security, Education, Protection, Emergency Shelter and Logistics. Read more....

 

“The Struggles and Successes” People's voices on WASH

 

Experience has shown that it is easier to change the habit of people in case of drinking water by asking them to switch from unsafe to safe sources than to change their sanitation habits. Changing people’s habit of open defecation and getting them to switch to sanitary toilets has been quite challenging for many intervening agencies across the country. However, there are instances where the community has adopted new toilet habits quickly because of the high level of commitment and motivation by community leaders who have attempted to uphold the toilet as a symbol of dignity. This has happened in the Sinha Gram Panchayat in the state of CG, where a woman leader has proved that WASH can be successfully implemented and behaviour change adopted by the community. The entire action has taken place as a result of dedicated efforts of Non Government Organisation (NGO), Lok Shakti Samiti (LSS) , Raigadh. Read more....

 

Tracking Toilets on the Ground Case Studies from Jharkhand

 

The National Rural Drinking Water Programme has a Village Water and Sanitation Committee (VWSC) in each Gram Panchyat, village and ward to ensure safe drinking water supply and sanitation facility. The VWSC consists of six to 12 members comprising elected Panchayat members, and is duly represented by Scheduled Castes, Scheduled Tribes and at least 50 percent women. As per the directive of Drinking Water and Sanitation Department (DWSD) of Ranchi, a Jal Sahiya (Water Friend) is selected from the VWSC, who will not only ensure better services in her village by mobilising households to construct toilets but also champion the department’s goals on the ground. Read more....

 

MODEL OF CLEANLINESS IN KHAROUDI VILLAGE IN HOSHIARPUR DISTRICT OF PUNJAB

 

The wastewater generated from various household and other activities in rural areas overflows into open surface drains and is ultimately disposed off into village ponds thereby contaminating it. Seepage from pit latrines may also be affecting the underground water. His Excellency, Dr. A.P.J Abdul Kalam, President of India while distributing the 1st Nirmal Gram Puraskars on 24th of February 2005 in Vigyan Bhawan referred to Kharoudi village in Hoshiarpur district of Punjab as a “model” that understood the necessity of clean drinking water, sanitation, solid and liquid waste management and hygiene as a method to foster public health of the village community. The NRIs of the village have done enough in bringing about dramatic improvement in its sewage disposal system, the maintenance of roads, computers, schools, parks, libraries in Kharoudi village of Punjab to attract the attention of His Excellency, Dr. A.P.J Abdul Kalam, President of India in March 2003 to inaugurate the project, the first of its kind not only in Punjab but also in India. Read more....

 

Beyond Construction USE BY ALL

 

A group of 53 sanitation and hygiene promotion practitioners met in BRAC’s Centre for Development Management in Rajendrapur, Bangladesh from 29 to 31 January 2008. The meeting marked the start of the International Year of Sanitation (IYS) and practitioners came together to share and learn from their peers. Representatives from each organisation that attended wrote a case study about their work. They shared their experiences, reflecting on the challenges in the region and identifying ways to work together. Read more....

 

Incinerator for School Toilet Waste

 

The Total sanitation campaign has brought about a welcome change in the rural areas in the improvement of sanitation facilities in the villages including other institutions like schools, anganwadies, health centres etc.,. In rural areas, with increasing in all these institutions the disposal of waste is becoming a serious problem. Both biodegradable and non biodegradable waste can prove hazardous for health, if proper and complete disposal is not done. In schools especially, disposal of sanitary cloth and sanitary napkins in girls’ toilets is big problem. Read more....

 

Sanitation and hygiene in India

 

“Success Stories-Sanitation and hygiene in India”, which have been developed and published by United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). It presents the success stories of Total Sanitation Campaign (TSC) and its impact all across India. The success stories demonstrated in West Bengal, Gujarat, Maharashtra and Tamil Nadu with such pioneering effort in sanitation was that it was managed by the Gram Panchayat, and has undertaken many enterprising activities by promotion of community participation particularly women’s SHGS who energized their community and brought about dramatic and positive change. It has also encouraged others to follow the path towards improved sanitation. Read more....

 

Ensuring Water and Sanitation: The SHG way

 

If water is life, sanitation is surely a `way of life’ and access’ to such facilities definitely has an impact on the quality of human life and health as well as the incidence and the spread of diseases; needless to mention, the broader human development programme. The programme of water and sanitation has definitely evolved and moved beyond from top down to bottom approach focusing on community participation both in planning and implementation. There have been numerous efforts, which have strengthened this programme over the years. Some of them quite aptly been highlighted during the Nirmal Gram Puraskar Ceremony held in February 20051 , by His Excellency Dr. A.P.J Abdul Kalam, President of India who shared his experiences related to sanitation in various places in India including Keerapalayam, Cuddalore district and Gandhi Nagar Town Panchayat, Vellore district of Tamil Nadu. He desired that such cases might be examined with possibilities of replication in other parts of the country. Read more....

 

Sanitation: The hidden gender problem

 

Munni sits holding a plate laden with three large rotis topped with a generous helping of spicy dal (lentils). She is hungry, but will not eat it yet. Covering the food with another plate, she quietly puts it away, while her husband and two teenage sons quickly polish off what is on their plates. Read more....

 

Women's collective makes sanitation programme a success in Bihar

 

“Women's collective makes sanitation programme a success in Bihar” has been written Alok Kumar in India Infrastructure Report, published in 2007 by United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). This case study is the initiative of UNICEF to build up a strategic partnership with the Mahila Samakhya a forum of 2191 women’s self-help groups to enhance sanitation and hygiene in 10 districts of Bihar under the Total Sanitation Campaign (TSC). Read more....

 

India, Andhra Pradesh: Why families choose toilets – to protect older parents and younger daughters

 

Why do families build toilets? If the family tradition for many generations has been to defecate in the open – using local woods or accepted sites, then what is the incentive to make a break and opt for a toilet instead? Concern for daughters and for elderly relatives are two factors often mentioned by families as motivating factors, especially as ‘safe’ places to defecate outside disappear. Read more....

 

A beauty contest for toilets

 

Providing sufficient toilet access is key to meeting health and sanitation targets. But it is difficult to ensure that facilities are used properly and maintained. An innovative post-tsunami project in a remote Indian village has provided a timely reminder that behavioural change is a slow process requiring local ownership and ?out of the box? thinking. In the aftermath of the 2004 Asian tsunami, two non-profit organizations were created ? Friend-inNeed (FIN) Trust in India and its partner organisation, Association Un Ami, in France. Their purpose was to initiate rehabilitation projects in the village of Kameshwaram, along the Tamil Nadu coast in southeast India. In collaboration with UNICEF and SCOPE, an Indian NGO, FIN Trust mobilised resources to build approximately 250 toilets. These toilets would provide sanitation facilities for 20% of the village. Read more....

 

Success Story of Menstrual Hygiene Scheme (Kathua district, Jammu & Kashmir)

 

Hiranagar is a town in Kathua district in the state of Jammu and Kashmir, having diverse terrain. Rajkumai, the ASHA worker of village Thakurpura, Banoti Block, Kathua district received sanitary napkins in mid-2012, and she says there is no looking back since… “since the State sent us Freeday, the girls of my village have been very happy. We had never thought that the Government could be so understanding to girl issues and especially, one which is so personal to all!”. Read more....

 

Success Story of Menstrual Hygiene Scheme (Dhubri district, Assam)

 

‘Freedays’ paves way for increased school attendance among girls Missing school four or five days a month has been a routine affair for Aruna, a Class X student (name changed on request). Not that she does not love going to school or that she engages in any entertainment activities by bunking school, but she does this out of her inability to continue with her classes during the four or five days during her menstruation. Says Aruna, “I feel hesitant to ask my teacher to use the bathroom several times a day. That is why I prefer to stay out of school during those four or five days in a month.” Aruna’s father does not earn enough to buy her costly sanitary napkins available in the market and hence she is bound to use traditional materials like clothes during her menstruation. Read more....

 

More children stunted in India than in sub-Saharan Africa

 

Studies show a link between open defecation and stunted development, but merely building toilets may not be the answer. Children in India are shorter when compared to those in sub-Saharan Africa even though Indians have higher income levels. This paradox cannot be explained by genetic differences between the two. Government estimates show that 48% of children in India below the age of five are stunted, or have low height for their age. Read more....

 

Large-scale ecological sanitation in peri-urban area El Alto city, Bolivia

 

This case study describes the project of UDDTs construction in El Alto, Bolivia. The project developed by the NGO Fundación Sumaj Huasi (La Paz) and had financial support from the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida), technical support from Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) and political support from Ministry of Environment and Water of Bolivia, Vice Ministry of Potable Water and Basic Sanitation, Federation of Neighbourhood Association of El Alto city (Fejuve), and local sub municipalities. Read more....

 

Case Study on Decentralised Water Management - JHARKHAND

 

This case study narrates the successful initiatives taken by Mr. Rakesh Bhagat, Mukhiya through the Village Water and Sanitation Committee (VWSC) in Bero Panchayat (Bero Block) of Ranchi district of Jharkhand in the context of revival of a dysfunctional piped water supply scheme. According to the policy guidelines of the Drinking Water and Sanitation Department (DWSD) of the Government of Jharkhand, the VWSCs are the cornerstone of implementation of the national Flagships namely, NBA (Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan) and NRDWP (National Rural Drinking Water Programme). VWSCs are formed at the revenue village level; thus a Gram Panchayat will have as many VWSCs as the revenue villages under its jurisdiction. VWSCs are formed under the constitutional provisions of the Panchayati Raj Act. With a view to decentralise the implementation and management of water and sanitation programmes, funds are being transferred to the VWSC accounts. Read more....

 

Successful Experiment Of "shaft Well" to provide clean drinking water in the Quality affected villages

 

Case Stories on Menstrual Hygiene

 

A grade 9 student of Panchagram High School, Ghaighata Block, North 24 Parganas, West Bengal, the first rank holder in class with a lot of dreams to excel in life- this is Kheyali who is just 13 years old. Dipayanti is 14 and she is in Grade 10. Both Kheyali and Dipayanti share two things in common. They go to the same school and they both are members of the School WATSAN Committee. Water For People have installedan arsenic filter, sanitary block and drinking water station in their school as well as established a WATSAN Committee with students and teachers as its members to look at the operation and maintenance of the created facilities. Read more....

 

Case Study on Sustainability and financial viability of urban water supply and sanitation in dryland areas in India

 

The turn of the century from the twentieth to the twentyfirst witnessed an important historical transition. For the first time in human history more than half the population are now residing in urban habitats, which are the main drivers of economic activity. This increasing urbanisation worldwide, especially in the third world countries, is of an informal and unplanned nature and has led to tremendous social and environmental pressures on towns and cities. More than a billion people lived in cities that exceeded healthful levels of air quality, 420 million had inadequate sanitation; and 220 million city dwellers did not have access to safe drinking water (Leitmann 7). Consequently urban planning and management have currently become severely stressed. Read more....

 

Case Study on Soap stories and toilet tales

 

The importance of the safe disposal of human excreta and handwashing with soap as critical public health interventions for rural and urban communities is undisputed. We know that community-wide, consistent use of latrines, combined with adequate handwashing can drastically reduce the disease burden among children and their families. What is important is the course of behavioural and social change in communities, schools and individuals that takes place resulting from these interventions, and the more far reaching development outcomes of these processes. Read more....

 

Case Study on Sanitation and hygiene in developing countries: identifying and responding to barriers

 

Many people believe that simply providing a fresh, clean water supply will substantially reduce water-borne illnesses. What most people do not know is that safe hygiene practices and access to sanitation are crucial for combating the main health threats to children under five, in particular diarrhoea. Approximately 88 per cent of all diarrhoea infections worldwide are attributed to unsafe water supply, the lack of safe hygiene practices and basic sanitation infrastructure (Evans 2005). And the scale of the problem is immense: today, nearly twice as many people lack access to sanitation compared with water supply (UN 2005). Read more....

 

Case Study on Menstrual Hygiene and the girl child

 

Deepika is seen dropping the Rs 2/- coin in the sanitary napkin vending machine. The thirteen-year-old is unprepared for the onset of her menstrual periods. Yogeshwari, her friend and classmate has accompanied her to the staffroom. Deepika is terribly embarrassed but is relieved to avail of a sanitary napkin in time. This is the common case with most adolescent girls her age and the napkin vending machine in the school premises is a blessing in disguise. Read more....

 

Case Study on Sustainability of Rural Sanitation Marketing in Vietnam

 

The task manager for the study was Jacqueline Devine of the Water and Sanitation Program (WSP), who also reviewed this report. The study was executed by IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre, The Hague, the Netherlands, and ADCOM Consultants in Hanoi, Vietnam. The respective international and national team were Dr. Christine Sijbesma of IRC and Dr. Truong Xuan Truong of ADCOM. ADCOM team members were Dinh Ngoc Bich, Dr. Ha Viet Hung, Le Duc Hanh, Nguyen Thi Hong Sam, Nguyen Kim Thai, Ho Thi Kim Uyen, Nguyen Nhu Trang, and Nguyen Tuan Minh. Joanna Rhodes of IRC edited the case study report and Amy Grossman of WSP edited the study for publication, with assistance from Kara Watkins. Read more....

 

Getting Africa to meet the sanitation MDG Lessons from rwanda

 

According to the 2010 Joint Monitoring Program (JMP) update household access to sanitation facilities has increased faster in rural Rwanda than in any other country in Sub-Saharan Africa. Almost four million people gained access to improved sanitation between 1990 and 2008. 54% of the population currently has access to improved sanitation, up from a baseline of 23% in 1990.1 Most of this progress has been with households upgrading ‘unimproved’ latrines to improved hygienic ones. While the greatest gains have been in rural areas, improvements in urban sanitation are notable as coverage has increased despite tremendous growth in the urban population. Read more....

 

Study of Waste Water Treatment Technologies adopted in Ludhiana and Muktasar Districts of Punjab by the State Government

 

Urine-diverting dry toilets at Adama University, Adama, Ethiopia (draft)

 

This case study is about a pilot scale construction of urine diverting dry toilets (UDDTs) at Adama University, Ethiopia. A major challenge for most Ethiopian universities is the insufficient water supply and the situation at AU which has a population of more than 13,000 students is no exception. Based on this, the University Capacity Building Programme (UCBP), Ethiopia with the support of GIZ International Services (formerly, GTZ International Services) in Ethiopia and OtterWasser GmbH, designed, funded and constructed a UDDT complex for some(but not all) staff and students at AU in Ethiopia. Read more....

 

Translating Research into National-Scale Change: A Case Study From Kenya of Wash in Schools

 

Recent years have seen greater attention to achieving national-scale sustainable school water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services. Yet practitioners and advocates focusing on school WASH services face manifold challenges and pitfalls. They must engage and develop partnerships with a diverse set of government, community, and development-sector stakeholders and navigate often complex policy environments. They must also develop a robust evidence base, select a coherent set of manageable objectives, learn how to constantly adapt and re-adapt tactics when policies change, identify the right staff given limited resources, and find ways to effectively monitor progress. Read more....

 

Sustainability of Total Sanitation Campaign at Kambalwadi

 

Total sanitation campaign (TSC) has aimed towards cleanliness and is achieving considerable success in the State of Maharashtra in India. The campaign has been instituted Award for clean villages in year 2000 by the Maharashtra State Government in the name of Sant Gadge Baba Maharaj to foster a new culture of self-development through community action. The village Kambalwadi voluntarily participated and succeeded in self-development and achieved sustained growth with people’s active participation and is playing a crucial role in passing a massage of clean and self-developed village. This paper provides the details of these major achievements. Read more....

 

Plan India’s School Wash Project:(Orissa and Uttarakhand)

 

Plan India supported School WASH project is being implemented in three districts (Mayurbhanj, Gajapati and Uttarkashi) of two states (Odisha and Uttarakhand) in India since last one and half year. The project basically aims at promoting improved hygiene practices among school children (and their non-school attending peers) and realizing their rights to adequate school WASH infrastructure that is universally accessible and having dedicated facilities for girls. The project has already completed phase 1 of Its implementation on 31st July 2011 and the phase 2 is in implementation, which would continue till 31st July 2012. The project covers around 45000 children of 462 schools in three project districts. The project is implemented through its partner organization Sri Bhuvneshwari Mahila Ashram (SBMA), Centre for Youth and Social Development (CYSD) and Society for the Welfare of Weaker Sections (SWWS). Read more....

 

Alternative Sanitation Initiative in Khagaria District, Bihar

 

Megh Pyne Abhiyan (MPA) in partnership with SAMTA (partner organization in Khagaria district) is piloting the localized version of Phaydemand Shauchalay  aka productive toilet/ecological sanitation in two tolas (hamlets) (Nepal and Railway tola of Khagaria district) as an alternative and appropriate utility  for the flood prone areas of Bihar. This is a unique collaborative initiative in north Bihar because of the coming together of Public Health and Engineering Department (PHED), Government of Bihar; DFID – Sector Wide Approach to Strengthening Health (SWASTH) program; habitants of Nepal and Railway tola and MPA in establishing a region specific sanitation solution for sustained use and benefit. The project is being jointly funded by PHED and DFID-SWASTH along with local contributions from Nepal and Railway tola. Read more....

 

Alternative Sanitation Initiative in West Champaran District, Bihar

 

Megh Pyne Abhiyan in partnership with Water Action is executing a peoples’ centered, driven and owned alternative secure sanitation, personal and menstrual hygiene management process and facilities in Burmi Tola, a flood prone hamlet of Rupaulia village of West Champara district in Bihar. The initiative is being supported by Stockholm Environment Institute, Sweden and Wash Institute, India. Read more....

 

Success Story Total sanitation Campaign Project - Khammam  Andhra Pradesh

 

Khammam district comprises of 46 mandals grouped into four into Revenue Divisions-Khammam, Kothagudem, Paloncha and Bhadrachalam . Khammam has been in the news as being one of the important destinations of tourism, agriculture, industries, minerals and developmental activities in Andhara Pradesh. Read more....

 

Success stories of first Nirmal gram Puraskar

 

Nandigram II block (East Medinipur District, West Bengal) has achieved the distinction of being the first block in the country to have saturated all rural households with sanitary toilets. The key to success has been the close coordination of District and Block Panchayats and Ram Krishna Mission Lok Siksha Parishad, facilitated by UNICEF with technical inputs for capacity development and IEC. This was supported by State level policies, timely fund allocation, close monitoring and coordinated by the State Sanitation Cell. Above all, strong political commitment also paved way for overcoming obstacles. But the key behind this success had been the promotion of community participation and establishment of Rural Sanitary Marts (RSMs) at the block level to produce and supply the necessary low cost sanitary materials. Read more....

 

A Case Study of Keeraplayam Experience

 

If water is life, sanitation is surely a `way of life’ and access’ to such facilities definitely has an impact on the quality of human life and health as well as the incidence and the spread of diseases; needless to mention, the broader human development programme. The programme of water and sanitation has definitely evolved and moved beyond from top down to bottom approach focusing on community participation both in planning and implementation. There have been numerous efforts, which have strengthened this programme over the years. Some of them quite aptly been highlighted during the Nirmal Gram Puraskar Ceremony held in February 20051 , by His Excellency Dr. A.P.J Abdul Kalam, President of India who shared his experiences related to sanitation in various places in India including Keerapalayam, Cuddalore district and Gandhi Nagar Town Panchayat, Vellore district of Tamil Nadu. He desired that such cases might be examined with possibilities of replication in other parts of the country. Read more....

 

Incinerator for School Toilet Waste

 

The Total sanitation campaign has brought about a welcome change in the rural areas in the improvement of sanitation facilities in the villages including other institutions like schools, anganwadies, health centres etc.,. In rural areas, with increasing in all these institutions the disposal of waste is becoming a serious problem. Both biodegradable and non biodegradable waste can prove hazardous for health, if proper and complete disposal is not done. In schools especially, disposal of sanitary cloth and sanitary napkins in girls’ toilets is big problem. Read more....

 

Community-Managed Sanitation in Kerala, India: Tools to Promote Governance and Improve Health

 

The Kerala Rural Water Supply and Sanitation Project was a pioneering grassroots approach initiated by the government of India. The project aimed to revolutionize sanitation services in the South Indian state of Kerala, with the primary goal of improving public health. An array of social accountability tools instituted in Kerala addressed the significant governance problems that had hindered water and sanitation reforms in local and national programs. Challenges to reform included a lack of accountability and transparency and broad corruption, which made local sanitation and hygiene problems more difficult to solve and accelerated the spread of infectious diseases throughout densely populated Kerala. Read more....

 

Attempting the Production of Public Goods through Microfinance: The Case of Water and Sanitation

 

This paper evaluates the attempt to create public goods via microfinance loans. Microfinance loans in the production of goods with public goods characteristics signify an emergent micro-privatisation. As a case study, the production of water and sanitation resources via microfinance loans is examined in India and Vietnam. It is found that microfinance projects for water and sanitation, which are based on individualism and a cost-recovery paradigm, ignore important collective action aspects and underlying distributional problems. Given its questionable effectiveness in other areas, the public goods iteration of microfinance leads not only to insufficient provision for the poor, but also may alienate these citizens from publicly accountable modes of governance and their human right to water. Read more....

 

Cost Effective Urinals for Schools: A Case Study

 

Provision of inadequate number of urinals in the toilets constructed in schools often leads to the development of unhygienic conditions. As a result, toilets created in most of the schools across the country are not being used and as a result most of them are in the state of disuse. According to the norms, one urinal for every 20 children must be provided. However, this norm is not being strictly followed due to lack of sufficient financial allocation for toilet construction in schools. Conventional toilets built incorporating this norm would require very high financial allocations. Read more....

 

Plan India’s School WASH Project: (Orissa and Uttarakhand)

 

Plan India supported School WASH project is being implemented in three districts (Mayurbhanj, Gajapati and Uttarkashi) of two states (Odisha and Uttarakhand) in India since last one and half year. The project basically aims at promoting improved hygiene practices among school children (and their non-school attending peers) and realizing their rights to adequate school WASH infrastructure that is universally accessible and having dedicated facilities for girls. The project has already completed phase 1 of Its implementation on 31st July 2011 and the phase 2 is in implementation, which would continue till 31st July 2012. The project covers around 45000 children of 462 schools in three project districts. The project is implemented through its partner organization Sri Bhuvneshwari Mahila Ashram (SBMA), Centre for Youth and Social Development (CYSD) and Society for the Welfare of Weaker Sections (SWWS). Read more....

 

Sustainability of Total Sanitation Campaign at Kambalwadi Village in Maharashtra, India

 

Total sanitation campaign (TSC) has aimed towards cleanliness and is achieving considerable success in the State of Maharashtra in India. The campaign has been instituted Award for clean villages in year 2000 by the Maharashtra State Government in the name of Sant Gadge Baba Maharaj to foster a new culture of self-development through community action. The village Kambalwadi voluntarily participated and succeeded in self-development and achieved sustained growth with people’s active participation and is playing a crucial role in passing a massage of clean and self-developed village. This paper provides the details of these major achievements. Read more....

 

Women Demand Better Water and Sanitation Facilities in New Delhi - Global Heart

 

NEW DELHI (WOMENSENEWS)--Thousands of women living in resettlement colonies on the fringes of this global city start the day by trudging to the nearest water standpipe or going through a narrow, muddy lane to queue up for a filthy community toilet. Read more....

 

URBAN HEALTH AND CARE-SEEKING BEHAVIOUR: A CASE STUDY OF SLUMS IN INDIA AND THE PHILIPPINES

 

Ensuring Water and Sanitation: The SHG way

 

If water is life, sanitation is surely a `way of life’ and access’ to such facilities definitely has an impact on the quality of human life and health as well as the incidence and the spread of diseases; needless to mention, the broader human development programme. The programme of water and sanitation has definitely evolved and moved beyond from top down to bottom approach focusing on community participation both in planning and implementation. There have been numerous efforts, which have strengthened this programme over the years. Some of them quite aptly been highlighted during the Nirmal Gram Puraskar Ceremony held in February 20051 , by His Excellency Dr. A.P.J Abdul Kalam, President of India who shared his experiences related to sanitation in various places in India including Keerapalayam, Cuddalore district and Gandhi Nagar Town Panchayat, Vellore district of Tamil Nadu. He desired that such cases might be examined with possibilities of replication in other parts of the country. Read more....

 

Urine is fertilizing crops and saving money in India

 

Consider these facts about urine: Adults produce about four to eight cups (one to two liters) per day, it's a reservoir of nitrogen, potassium and phosphorus, the same elements that nourish crops; and it's cheap to make. Read more....

 

Children Friendly Schools – UGANDA

 

As described in 2006 by the Ugandan Ministry of Education and Sports (MoES): “At independence in 1962, Uganda had a flourishing economy with an annual gross domestic product rate of 5% per annum, compared with an annual population growth rate of 2.65%. Export earnings not only financed the country’s import requirements but also produced a current account surplus. Uganda’s social indicators were comparable to, if not better than, most African countries. In the 1970s and 1908s, however, civil and military unrest resulted in the destruction of much economic and social infrastructure” (Republic of Uganda, Ministry of Education and Sports 2006). Read more....

 

Public toilet with biogas digester and water kiosk, Naivasha, Kenya.

 

The overall aim was to achieve sustainability through capacity building within the institutional water sector institutions towards professionalism, efficiency and commercialisation. The focus of this document is the public toilet; the water kiosk system is also briefly described. Read more....

 

Introducing SaniFOAM: A Framewrk to Analyze Sanitation Behaviors to Design Effective Sanitation Programs

 

With thanks to Yolande Coombes, Craig Kullmann, Eduardo Perez for their critical review and helpful suggestions; to Samantha Austin for research assistance; and a special thank you to Jason Cardosi who authored the concept note that led to the development of the SaniFOAM framework. Read more....

 

Decentralised wastewater management at Adarsh College, Badlapur, India

 

Badlapur Municipal Council and the Board of “Adarsh Vidya Mandir School” decided to incorporate an ecologically sound sanitation concept (Fig. 2) at the “Adarsh Vidyaprasarak Sanstha’s College of Arts & Commerce”. This concept does not only meet the sanitation needs of the students and the people attending special programmes such as wedding ceremonies at the school premises, but also protects the environment and raises awareness amongst the students, about the importance of water and sanitation in promoting health and hygiene. Read more....

 

Pour flush toilets with biogas plant at DSK Training Institute, Gujarat, India

 

UDD toilet centres at Navsarjan Boarding Schools, Gujarat, India

 

Reuse of human urine in aquaculture, Kalyani, West Bengal, India

 

Improvement of sanitation at Kanawat health center, Kanawat, Uganda

 

Blackwater and greywater reuse system Chorrillos, Lima, Peru

 

Improved traditional composting toilets with urine diversion, Leh, Jammu and Kashmir State, India

 

Ecological housing estate. Flintenbreite, Lübeck, Germany